How to congfigure your PC to use Googles DNS system

Goolge LogoGoogle has just launched its free DNS called Google Public DNS, which is a faster way to resolve DNS queries using its DNS servers . It uses the DNS cache on Google's DNS servers to resolve queies faster and in turn, takes you faster to the web page you requested.  DNS stands for Domain Name System and basically translates numeric IP addresses of servers that host web content into words. In addition to the fact that it can resolve DNS queries faster, Google's DNS also has security safeguards built in that prevent spoofing attacks. Spoofing attaks are when you think a website belongs to let's say a Bank but it does not really, the web page shown looks like exactly of that your Banks website but it is another website altogether, put in place for malicious purposes. In this article we will show you, in easy steps as how you can configure your Windows computer to use Google's DNS instead of the one provided by your Internet Service Provider (ISP).

Pick your Windows operating system below and follow the steps listed to change your DNS servers to Google's DNS servers. If you have questions, you can write back to us, as well as Google has the following phone numbers put in place to provide support:

Google Public DNS telephone support

877-590-4367 in the U.S.

770-200-1201 outside the U.S

First of all Google Public DNS IP addresses are as follows:

8.8.8.8

8.8.4.4

The following instructions are from Google on how to setup your Operating System with its new Google Public DNS system:

Microsoft Windows

DNS settings are specified in the TCP/IP Properties window for the selected network connection. 

Example: Changing DNS server settings on Microsoft Windows Vista

  1. Go the Control Panel.
  2. Click Network and Internet, then Network and Sharing Center, then Manage network connections.
  3. Select the connection for which you want to configure Google Public DNS. For example:
    • To change the settings for an Ethernet connection, right-click Local Area Connection, and click Properties.
    • To change the settings for a wireless connection, right-click Wireless Network Connection, and click Properties.
    If you are prompted for an administrator password or confirmation, type the password or provide confirmation.
  4. Select the Networking tab. Under This connection uses the following items, click Internet Protocol Version 4 (TCP/IPv4), and then click Properties.
  5. Click Advanced and select the DNS tab. If there are any DNS server IP addresses listed there, write them down for future reference, and remove them from this window.
  6. Click OK.
  7. Select Use the following DNS server addresses. If there are any IP addresses listed in the Preferred DNS server or Alternate DNS server, write them down for future reference.
  8. Replace those addresses with the IP addresses of the Google DNS servers: 8.8.8.8 and 8.8.4.4.
  9. Restart the connection you selected in step 3.
  10. Test that your setup is working correctly; see Testing your new settings below.
  11. Repeat the procedure for additional network connections you want to change.
     

Mac OS X

DNS settings are specified in the Network window. 

Example: Changing DNS server settings on Mac OS 10.5

  1. From the Apple menu, click System Preferences, then click Network. If you are prompted for an administrator password or confirmation, type the password or provide confirmation.
  2. Select the connection for which you want to configure Google Public DNS. For example:
    • To change the settings for an Ethernet connection, select Built-In Ethernet, and click Advanced.
    • To change the settings for a wireless connection, select Airport, and click Advanced.
  3. Select the DNS tab.
  4. Click + to replace any listed addresses with, or add, the Google IP addresses at the top of the list: 8.8.8.8 and 8.8.4.4.
  5. Click Apply and OK.
  6. Test that your setup is working correctly; see Testing your new settings below.
  7. Repeat the procedure for additional network connections you want to change.

Linux

In most modern Linux distributions, DNS settings are configured through Network Manager.

Example: Changing DNS server settings on Ubuntu

  1. In the System menu, click Preferences, then click Network Connections.
  2. Select the connection for which you want to configure Google Public DNS. For example:
    • To change the settings for an Ethernet connection, select the Wired tab, then select your network interface in the list. It is usually called eth0.
    • To change the settings for a wireless connection, select the Wireless tab, then select the appropriate wireless network.
  3. Click Edit, and in the window that appears, select the IPv4 Settings tab.
  4. If the selected method is Automatic (DHCP), open the dropdown and select Automatic (DHCP) addresses only instead. If the method is set to something else, do not change it.
  5. In the DNS servers field, enter the Google Public DNS IP addresses, separated by a space: 8.8.8.8  8.8.4.4
  6. Click Apply to save the change. If you are prompted for a password or confirmation, type the password or provide confirmation.
  7. Test that your setup is working correctly; see Testing your new settings below.
  8. Repeat the procedure for additional network connections you want to change.

If your distribution doesn't use Network Manager, your DNS settings are specified in /etc/resolv.conf.

Example: Changing DNS server settings on a Debian server

  1. Edit /etc/resolv.conf:
    sudo vi /etc/resolv.conf
  2. If any nameserver lines appear, write down the IP addresses for future reference.
  3. Replace the nameserver lines with, or add, the following lines:
    nameserver 8.8.8.8
    nameserver 8.8.4.4
  4. Save and exit.
  5. Restart any Internet clients you are using.
  6. Test that your setup is working correctly; see Testing your new settings below.

Additionally, if you are using DHCP client software that overwrites the settings in /etc/resolv.conf, you will need to set up the client accordingly by editing the client's configuration file.

Example: Configuring DHCP client sofware on a Debian server

  1. Back up /etc/resolv.conf:
    sudo cp /etc/resolv.conf /etc/resolv.conf.auto
  2. Edit /etc/dhcp3/dhclient.conf:
    sudo vi /etc/dhcp3/dhclient.conf
  3. If there is a line containing domain-name-servers, write down the IP addresses for future reference.
  4. Replace that line with, or add, the following line:
    prepend domain-name-servers 8.8.8.8, 8.8.4.4;
  5. Save and exit.
  6. Restart any Internet clients you are using.
  7. Test that your setup is working correctly; see Testing your new settings below.

Routers

Every router uses a different user interface for configuring DNS server settings; we provide only a generic procedure below. For more information, please consult your router documentation.

Note: Some ISPs hard-code their DNS servers into the equipment they provide; if you are using such a device, you will not be able to configure it to use Google Public DNS. Instead, you can configure each of the computers connected to the router, as described above.

To change your settings on a router:

  1. In your browser, enter the IP address to access the router's administration console. 
  2. When prompted, enter the password to access network settings.
  3. Find the screen in which DNS server settings are specified. 
  4. If there are IP addresses specified in the fields for the primary and seconday DNS servers, write them down for future reference.
  5. Replace those addresses with Google IP addresses: 8.8.8.8 and 8.8.4.4.
  6. Save and exit.
  7. Restart your browser.
  8. Test that your setup is working correctly; see Testing your new settings below.

Mobile or other devices

DNS servers are typically specified under advanced wi-fi settings. However, as every mobile device uses a different user interface for configuring DNS server settings, we provide only a generic procedure below. For more information, please consult your mobile provider's documentation.

To change your settings on a mobile device:

  1. Go to the screen in which wi-fi settings are specified. 
  2. Find the screen in which DNS server settings are specified. 
  3. If there are IP addresses specified in the fields for the primary and seconday DNS servers, write them down for future reference.
  4. Replace those addresses with Google IP addresses: 8.8.8.8 and 8.8.4.4.
  5. Save and exit.
  6. Test that your setup is working correctly; see Testing your new settings below.

Testing your new settings

To test that the Google DNS resolver is working:

  1. From your browser, type in a hostname, such as http://www.google.com. If it resolves correctly, bookmark the page, and try accessing the page from the bookmark. If both of these tests work, everything is working correctly. If not, go to step 2.
  2. From your browser, type in a fixed IP address. You can use http://18.62.1.6/ (which points to the website http://eecs.mit.edu/) as the URL*. If this works correctly, bookmark the page, and try accessing the page from the bookmark. If these tests work (but step 1 fails), then there is a problem with your DNS configuration; check the steps above to make sure you have configured everything correctly. If these tests do not work, go to step 3.
  3. Roll back the DNS changes you made and run the tests again. If the tests still do not work, then there is a problem with your network settings; contact your ISP or network administrator for assistance.

* Google thanks MIT for granting permission to use this URL for the purposes of testing web connectivity.

Switching back to your old DNS settings

If you had not previously configured any customized DNS servers, to switch back to your old settings, in the window in which you specified the Google IP addresses, select the option to enable obtaining DNS server addresses automatically, and/or delete the Google IP addresses. This will revert your settings to using your ISP's default servers. 

If you need to manually specify any addresses, use the procedures above to specify the old IP addresses.

If necessary, restart your system.

That's about it, the above news can be verified from the Google Blog at http://googleblog.blogspot.com/2009/12/introducing-google-public-dns.html?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+blogspot%2FMKuf+%28Official+Google+Blog%29&utm_content=Google+Reader and the support instructions above are also located at http://code.google.com/speed/public-dns/docs/using.html

We hope this has been helpful and informative for you. If you have any feedback or want further help, or just want to share your comments, do not hesitate to leave us a comment here or use our feedback form on the Contact Us page

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